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  • Amicus Brief: American Society of Journalists v. Xavier Becerra

    This court should reverse the district court, join its sister circuits in affirming that Reed is the law of the land, and grant journalists their day in court.

  • Amicus Brief: Higginson v. Becerra

    The right to vote, like the rights guaranteed by the Equal Protection Clause, is an individual right. Vote dilution claims, however, treat people simply as members of their racial group.

  • Amicus Brief: Jessop v. City of Fresno

    "Now, not only can officials seize and retain personal property with little judicial oversight under the guise of civil asset forfeiture; law enforcement also can outright steal personal property for their own use with impunity and without fear of civil liability. "

  • Amicus Brief: Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard

    Harvard’s discrimination against Asian American applicants prolongs a long history of discrimination against Asian Americans in the United States. The judgment of the district court should be reversed.

  • Amicus Brief: West v. Winfield

    The reasoning embraced by the Ninth and Second Circuits—requiring a Section 1983 plaintiff to point to a decided case with identical, or nearly so, factual allegations in order to defeat qualified immunity—sets an impossible standard

  • Amicus Brief: Torres v. Madrid

    This Court should reverse the Tenth Circuit and return uniformity and predictability to the Court’s Fourth Amendment jurisprudence.

  • Amicus Brief: Fleck v. Wetch

    The case warrants this Court’s review because many state and local governments are refusing to comply with Janus’ waiver requirement.

  • Amicus Brief: Salgado v. United States

    Because lower courts have charted a course around CAFRA’s fee-shifting provision, inefficient and unmeritorious civil asset forfeiture actions are not adequately deterred.

  • Amicus Brief: Shaffer v. Pennsylvania

    This Court should grant the petition for a writ of certiorari to clarify the applicability — if any — of the “private search” doctrine to today’s digital world.