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Reason Foundation

Bastiat Prize Winners

2003-2011

2011 WINNER:
$50,000 Bastiat Prize for Journalism shared by Tom Easton and Virginia Postrel

November 7, 2011

NEW YORK CITY—At the tenth annual Bastiat Prize for Journalism, First Place – and $50,000 in prize money – was shared by Tom Easton of The Economist (UK) and Virginia Postrel of Bloomberg News (for pieces published by The Wall Street Journal and by Bloomberg). Both also received an engraved crystal candlestick – a nod to Bastiat’s ironic and iconic Pétition. Second prize (including $15,000 and a candlestick) went to Jeff Jacoby of the Boston Globe. Third prize (including $5,000 and a candlestick) went to Salil Tripathi, a London-based journalist.

The Bastiat Prize celebrates journalists whose writing emulates the great 19th Century French classical liberal philosopher and politician, Frédéric Bastiat.

“Easton and Postrel are modern day Bastiats,” said IPN President, Julian Morris. “Their writing is witty and erudite; they explain clearly and eloquently the importance of freedom and the dangers of restricting freedom,” he continued.

Tom Easton's winning article:
Bamboo Capitalism

Virginia Postrel's winning articles:
No Free Locavore Lunch
Need a Lightbulb? Uncle Sam Gets to Decide
The Fantasy of Survivalism

Jeff Jacoby's winning articles:
A deadly organ donor system
Clunker Q&A [or: The Truth about Cash for Clunkers]
"A ride in Big Brother's Audi" [or: "Big Brother out of control"]

Salil Tripathi's winning articles:
Poor conditions for borrowing in India
A Dirigisme for the Poor
You are Not Free

Judges this year were: Gurcharan Das, Richard Fisher, Steve Forbes, Chrystia Freeland, Charles Kadlec, Dominic Lawson, James Piereson, Carl Schramm, and Amity Shlaes. Previous judges have included Lady Thatcher, the Late Milton Friedman, and Professor James Buchanan.
 
Entries for the Bastiat prize are judged by their: support for the institutions of the free society, persuasiveness, wit and creativity, relevance, and clarity and simplicity. The Prize is open to all writers, anywhere in the world; and the writers need not be associated with any specific publication.
 
International Policy Network (IPN) is an independent, non-partisan, non-governmental, educational charity, which seeks to improve public understanding of the role of the institutions of the free society.
 
The Bastiat Prize was supported by a generous gift from Thomas W. Smith Foundation. Additional sponsorship was provided by Bloomberg News, Beth and Ravenel Curry, the Franklin Center for Government and Public Policy, Heritage Foundation Center for Media and Public Policy, Roger and Susan Hertog, Pamela Hoiles, Charles Kadlec, Legatum Institute, James Lyle, Gerry Ohrstrom, Daniel Oliver, James Piereson, Joseph and Diane Steinberg, Judy and Michael Steinhardt, Strategas Research Partners, the Alice M. and Thomas J. Tisch Foundation, The Wall Street Journal, Ali Wambold and Monica Gerard-Sharp. Media sponsorship was provided by The American Spectator, CapitalHQ, National Review, Real Clear Politics, the Reason Foundation, and The Wall Street Journal Europe.


2010 WINNER:
Stephens, Delingpole win 2010 Bastiat Prizes

November 12, 2010

NEW YORK CITY—Last night at an awards dinner in New York City, Julian Morris announced the winners of the 2010 Bastiat Prize and the 2010 Bastiat Prize for Online Journalism.

Bastiat Prize Winners

Bastiat Prize for Online Journalism

James Delingpole writes

Why does the Bastiat Prize matter so much? Because it’s about the only prize left which celebrates those true journalistic virtues of scepticism and inquiry which our libtard MSM [mainstream media] has all but abandoned in its eagerness to suck up to whichever bunch of statist shysters currently happen to be in power. It’s about free markets, about small government, about liberty.


2009 WINNER:
Hasnas wins Bastiat Prize for article of "Extraordinary concision, wit and relevance" in defense of the rule of law

October 27, 2009

NEW YORK CITY—John Hasnas has won the eighth annual Bastiat Prize for Journalism for “The ‘Unseen’ Deserve Empathy, Too”, published in the Wall Street Journal. Hasnas, a Professor at Georgetown University, utilized Bastiat’s analysis in “What is seen and what is not seen” to explain why judges should base their decisions on the rule of law, not on their “compassion” and “empathy” towards plaintiffs or defendants as President Obama had suggested in appointing Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

At IPN’s Eighth Annual Bastiat Dinner held in New York City on Monday October 26, Hasnas was presented with US$10,000–and a crystal candlestick -- from America’s leading satirist, P.J. O’Rourke. After receiving the prize, Hasnas remarked:

“In 1850, Frederic Bastiat stated a simple, important economic truth. In my column, I merely restated that truth and applied it in the context of judicial decision-making. Receiving the Bastiat Prize for doing so caused me to realize that one of the invaluable services that journalists render is to preserve truths discovered in the past and remind us of them in the present when they are needed.”

Judges of the Bastiat Prize this year included Hon. Douglas Ginsburg, of the D.C. Court of Appeals, as well as former winners Amity Shlaes (now with Bloomberg), Brian Carney (Wall Street Journal), and Clive Crook (The Atlantic Monthly and The Financial Times).

The Bastiat Prize was founded in 2001 by International Policy Network (IPN). The Prize recognizes writers who wittily and eloquently explain, promote and defend the principles of the free society.

Commenting on the choice of this year’s winner, Julian Morris, Executive Director of IPN, said, “Like Bastiat, upon whose ideas he draws, Hasnas explains with extraordinary concision, wit and relevance the importance to the free society of law based on clear, abstract principles.”

Second place ($4,000) went to Robert Guest, Washington Correspondent of The Economist. Third place ($1,000) went to Robert Robb, editorial columnist for the Arizona Republic.

IPN is a global think tank headquartered in London. IPN seeks to encourage better public understanding of the role of the institutions of the free society in social and economic development, and works with likeminded thinkers and partner organizations in over 70 countries.

2009 WINNER ANNOUNCEMENT:

Hannan and Dalmia Share Bastiat Prize for Online Journalism

October 27, 2009

NEW YORK CITY—At a ceremony last night, International Policy Network awarded the first Bastiat Prize for Online Journalism jointly to Daniel Hannan of the Daily Telegraph (UK) and Shikha Dalmia of the Reason Foundation (US) and Forbes.com columnist.

Julian Morris, Executive Director of International Policy Network, congratulated Hannan and Dalmia, saying, “Dan’s erudite, witty blog posts soar above the online maelstrom, delivering intercontinental ballistic support for free markets, decentralised and limited government, and the rule of law. Meanwhile, Dalmia’s articles for Forbes.com are brilliant exercises in quiet persuasion, challenging preconceptions regarding the supposed benefits of government intervention.”

The $3,000 prize pot will be split equally between the winners. Each received an engraved crystal candlestick, a reference to Frederic Bastiat’s essay “A Petition”, in which the candlemakers of France petition the French government to block their primary source of competition, the sun.

IPN is a global think tank headquartered in London. IPN seeks to encourage better public understanding of the role of the institutions of the free society in social and economic development, and works with likeminded thinkers and partner organizations in over 70 countries.


2008 WINNER:
Barton Hinkle wins 2008 Bastiat Prize for Journalism

October 23, 2008

NEW YORK CITY—The winner of IPN's 2008 Bastiat Prize was Barton Hinkle of the Richmond Times-Dispatch. (Barton was also a finalist for the Prize in 2007). This year's judges felt that Barton’s articles were most evocative of Bastiat, both stylistically and intellectually. The prizes for Second and Third place went to Swaminathan Aiyar and Fraser Nelson, respectively.

Following the award, Barton gave an emotional speech in which he compared himself and the attendant audience – which included many of the leading lights of the US free market movement – to an idea proposed in an essay by Albert J. Nock, entitled “Isaiah’s Job”. He said that the assembled guests were the “Remnant” – those who continue to explain, defend and promote the institutions of the free society in an environment that is predominantly hostile to such views. As governments in the US and Europe take control of financial companies left, right and center, with narry a whimper from the public, the role of the Remnant has become more important than at any time in the past two decades.

The guest speaker at the event was Andrew Mwenda, a Ugandan journalist, who reminded the attendees that if we want to keep the light of liberty burning, we must resist government attempts to silence freedom of expression even if it means risking our own liberty. Andrew has been jailed a dozen times for criticising the Ugandan government and currently faces charges that carry a maximum combined sentence of 150 years.


2007 WINNER:
Indian Journalist Wins 2007 Frederic Bastiat Prize for Journalism

October 25, 2007

NEW YORK CITY—Last night, the sixth annual Bastiat Prize for Journalism was awarded to Indian journalist Amit Varma, an editorial columnist for Mint (a joint venture between the Wall Street Journal and India’s Hindustan Times).

Varma was thrilled to receive the Prize, which came with US $10,000 and an engraved crystal candlestick, evocative of Frederic Bastiat’s satirical essay in which the candle makers of France petition the government to block out their competition: the sun. He said:

“Frederic Bastiat is one of my intellectual heroes and his ideas are terribly relevant to modern India. Therefore I’m honored to win the Bastiat Prize, especially given the caliber of the other five finalists in the competition.”

Commenting on the winner, Julian Morris, Executive Director of International Policy Network, the organization which runs the Bastiat Prize, said:

“Varma’s articles are brilliant and witty. Like Bastiat, he uses satire to explain and criticize overbearing government regulation. While his subject matter is India, the ideas are universal.”

Second place ($4,000 and a candlestick) went to Clive Crook, senior editor of The Atlantic Monthly, and Associate Editor of the Financial Times. Third place ($1,000 and candlestick) went to Jonah Goldberg, Contributing Editor to National Review and a syndicated columnist.

This was the biggest competition to date, with 280 entrants from a field including many very established journalists. The winners were chosen by a panel of judges including former winners Amity Shlaes (now with Bloomberg) and Brian Carney (Wall Street Journal).

The Bastiat Prize was established in 2002 by International Policy Network, a global think tank based in London. The Prize recognizes journalists whose writings wittily and eloquently explain, promote and defend the principles of the free society, including property rights, free markets and the rule of law.

Other previous winners of the Bastiat Prize have included Tim Harford (Financial Times), Mary Anastasia O’Grady (Wall Street Journal) and Robert Guest (The Economist).


2006 WINNER:
Fifth Annual Bastiat Prize for Journalism Awarded Jointly to Tim Harford and Jamie Whyte

November 1, 2006

NEW YORK CITY—First prize in IPN’s Fifth Annual Bastiat Prize for Journalism was awarded jointly to Tim Harford of the Financial Times (UK) and Jamie Whyte, a freelance writer published in The Times (London), at the awards dinner held on November 1. Each of the co-winners received a cash award of $7,000 and an engraved crystal candlestick – a nod to Bastiat’s ironic ‘Petition to the Candlemakers of Paris’.

Third prize (a cash award of $1,000 and a candlestick) went to Rakesh Wadhwa, a freelance writer whose articles were published in The Himalayan Times (Nepal).

The Bastiat Prize, established by International Policy Network (IPN), celebrates journalists and writers whose published articles explain and promote the institutions of free society, emulating the 19th Century French philosopher Frédéric Bastiat.

“We had more entries than ever this year – over 250 – and they were of an incredibly high calibre,” said IPN’s executive director, Julian Morris. “All three winners were truly evocative of Bastiat: they clearly and eloquently explained complex ideas about the free society. As Tim Harford said in his acceptance speech, in many respects they went “beyond Bastiat” by carefully using data to support their arguments,” he continued.

Previous Bastiat Prize winners include Mary Anastasia O’Grady of the Wall Street Journal, Robert Guest of The Economist, Amity Shlaes (then) of the Financial Times, Sauvik Chakraverti of the Economic Times (India) and Brian Carney of the Wall Street Journal Europe.

The Bastiat Prize was first awarded in 2002 and judges have included Lady Thatcher and Nobel-Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman. The international panel of judges comprises many eminent individuals including Lord (Nigel) Lawson, former British Chancellor of the Exchequer; Edward Crane, founder and president of the Cato Institute; Lord Kalms of Edgware, founder of Dixons Group plc; Ruth Richardson, former Finance Minister of New Zealand, and the Hon. Douglas Ginsburg, Chief Judge of the Appeals Court of the District of Columbia.

Entries for the Bastiat Prize are judged by intellectual content of each article, the persuasiveness of the language used, the type of publication in which it appeared and the location of the author. The Prize was developed to encourage, recognise and reward writers whose published works elucidate the institutions of the free society, including free trade, property rights, the rule of law, freedom of contract, free speech and limited government.

International Policy Network (IPN) is an independent, non-partisan, non-governmental, educational charity, which seeks to improve public understanding of the role of the institutions of the free society.


2005 WINNER:
Mary O'Grady wins Bastiat Prize for journalism

October 26, 2005

NEW YORK CITY—The first prize in the Annual Bastiat Prize for Journalism was awarded to Mary Anastasia O’Grady of The Wall Street Journal at the awards dinner held on October 25. The prize included a cash award of $7,000 and an engraved candlestick – a nod to Bastiat’s ironic Petition to the Candlemakers of Paris.

Second prize (a cash award of $3,000 and an engraved candlestick) went to George Kerevan of The Scotstman (UK). An honourable mention and an engraved candlestick went to Allister Heath of The Business (UK).

The Bastiat Prize, established and run by International Policy Network (IPN), celebrates journalists whose writing cleverly and wittily promotes the institutions of free society, emulating the 19th Century French philosopher Frédéric Bastiat.

After thanking the editorial staff of the Wall Street Journal, O’Grady paid tribute to journalists “who defend freedom” and special attention to “Cuba’s independent journalists and writers, many of whom are in jail right now for the crime of refusing to conform. They are a constant source of inspiration for me.”

Bastiat judge Amity Shlaes, co-winner of the 2002 Bastiat Prize, said, “The general coverage of dirigiste Latin America is itself dirigiste. Mary breaks through the barriers and there is none like her.”

“We had more entries than ever this year – 180 – and of an incredibly high calibre,” said IPN executive director, Julian Morris. “We are very pleased with the judges’ decision and are looking forward to next year’s competition, which will open March 2006,” he continued.

Previous winners include Robert Guest of The Economist, Sauvik Chakraverti of the Economic Times (India), Brian Carney of the Wall Street Journal Europe, and British freelancer Stephen Pollard.

The Bastiat prize was first awarded in 2002 and judges have included Lady Thatcher and Nobel-Prize-winner Professor James Buchanan. The international panel of judges is composed of economists, former winners, academics and business people, and includes Nobel-prize winner Dr. Milton Friedman; Edward Crane, founder and president of the Cato Institute; Lord Kalms of Edgware, founder of the Dixons Group; Ruth Richardson, former Finance Minister of New Zealand, and Peruvian economist Hernando de Soto.

Entries for the Bastiat prize are judged by intellectual content of each article, the persuasiveness of the language used, the type of publication in which it appeared and the location of the author. The Prize is open to all writers, anywhere in the world; and the writers need not be associated with any specific publication. The prize was developed to encourage and reward writers whose published works promote the institutions of a free society: limited government, rule of law brokered by an independent judiciary, protection of private property, free markets, free speech, and sound science.

Acceptance speech by Mary Anastasia O'Grady, Winner of IPN's 2005 Bastiat Prize for Journalism

I want to thank the International Policy Network, both for awarding this prestigious prize to me and for all of its work on behalf of liberty, including the establishment of this very important recognition. Thank you very much.

I also want to thank the Wall Street Journal and especially the editorial page and Paul Gigot for giving me a place to write about the Latin American region from a classical liberal perspective.

Finally, I want to thank my editor George Melloan, who is the best boss and the best editor I could ever have hoped for. I share this honor with him.

Since we’re here tonight to recognize journalists who defend freedom, I’d like to take a moment to say a word about Cuba’s independent journalists and writers, many of whom are in jail right now for the crime of refusing to conform. They are a constant source of inspiration for me.

In 1999, before I was named a “counterrevolutionary” and forbidden to travel to Cuba, I took a trip to the island. A Cuban writer I know living in Spain had asked me to try to see a political dissident there, with whom he had established a correspondence. All he gave me was a phone number.

From a pay phone in the street in Havana, I called the number and was instructed where and when to meet my contact. In front of my hotel was a line of shiny cars and a group of uniformed drivers, who worked for the government. But none of them had any idea how to get to where I wanted to go. They got in a heated argument over the question and I finally walked away from them. It was the entrepreneurial taxi drivers with the old 1950s cars who knew the city and I happened upon one who agreed to take me to the address. I was a bit worried for him, because, as he explained to me, he was not permitted to carry foreigners. And it was quite clear that I was not a local….I am way too fat to pass for a starving Cuban. Happily, we managed to make it to the destination without being stopped.

We pulled up in front of what I can best describe as a prime example of that major soviet contribution to architecture: a concrete block. With its broken windows, it literally looked like a bombed out building in Sarajevo. I stupidly got in the tiny elevator in the lobby, which promptly began to climb, then stalled and went black. The diminutive elderly Cuban lady with me said nothing. We stood in the heat and darkness for almost ten minutes. I stayed calm by noting that she wasn’t panicking and figuring that this must have been routine. Then just as suddenly as it had stopped, the car lurched, the lights came back on and the ascent continued.

I tell you this to give you a feel for Cuba and to describe the general sense of poverty, entrepreneurial oppression, and hopelessness that characterized Havana in 1999. It was all very grim.

Yet once I entered the apartment of the dissident I was to interview, everything changed. He and his wife met me with smiles and enthusiasm and proceeded to tell me why they were convinced their country was changing. Sewer roaches were walking on the walls but they didn’t seem to notice. I had brought them a plastic bag filled with bars of soap, a rare commodity in Cuba and non-existent for anyone at odds with the regime. They were ecstatic.

Neither one of them had jobs, of course. He seemed terribly thin. But they were brimming with optimism. Their calculation was simple: The economic interests of so many small businesses—like my taxi driver-- together with the church and opposition groups that were circulating information bulletins, were slowly weakening the system. Change will come, he told me, not because the government wants it but because the younger members of the ruling class "know they cannot survive like this."

Four years later in March 2003 that man, along with some 75 others, was arrested in a sudden assault on the dissident community. He is now serving a sentence of more than 15 years. His arrest was part of a brutal crackdown explicitly designed to halt the process he had described to me during my visit. The regime decided it was not going to happen.

It’s estimated that there are some 350 political prisoners in Cuba today. All of them willingly pushed their luck at one time or another, fully aware of the downside risks to which they were exposed. And they are paying dearly for their crimes of dissent.

The Castro regime has not changed its methods of dealing with its critics in the nearly five decades it has been in power. The goal is to force the capitulation, “reeducation” and “rehabilitation” of the non-conformist. Beatings, torture, sleep deprivation, weeks of confinement in punishment cells that have little ventilation and are too small to lie down in, infestations, malnutrition, psychological manipulations and the use of common criminals to terrorize are all designed to break the spirit. Political prisoners are deliberately placed on opposite ends of the island from their families and a large number of them have medical conditions that go untreated.

What amazes me about these heroes is their capacity to resist. Armando Valladares—who spent 22 years as a guest in one of Fidel’s dungeons—revealed some of what inspires the will to resist, despite the suffering, in his memoir Against All Hope when he wrote that as long as he refused to give in, he saw himself as a free man. "They've taken everything away from me—or almost everything. I still have my smile, the proud sense that I'm a free man, and an eternally flowering garden in my soul."

Amazingly, after being nearly annihilated in March 2003, Cuba’s dissident movement is up and running again, spreading the gospel and recruiting new minds, according to reports from the island. The government is using the fullest extent of its power to try to extinguish that recovery by brutalizing the jailed. For their part, the prisoners have shown that they will not yield. They are an astonishing combination of hope and courage. Let’s not forget them.

Thank you.


2004 WINNER:
Robert Guest Wins 2004 Bastiat Prize for Journalism

October 13, 2004

LONDON/NEW YORK CITY—Last night, International Policy Network honoured Robert Guest, Africa Editor of The Economist magazine and author of The Shackled Continent (Macmillan, 2004), with first prize (US$ 7000 and a crystal candlestick) in IPN’s 2004 Frédéric Bastiat Prize for Journalism.

Guest won the prize for his 2003 survey of Africa for The Economist. “I am delighted to have won the Bastiat Prize” said Guest. “To my mind, no part of the world shows more clearly than Africa the need for economic liberty and the rule of law. Their absence in so many African countries keeps the continent needlessly poor, and that's something journalists have to keep shouting about.”

Second prize ($3000 and a crystal candlestick) was awarded to John Stossel, co-host of ABC News 20/20 and author of Give Me A Break (Harper Collins, 2004), whose winning articles ran in Reason magazine and on ABCNews.com.

An honourable mention (and a crystal candlestick) was awarded to Munir Attaullah, a columnist for the Daily Times in Pakistan.

The Bastiat Prize for Journalism is awarded annually by International Policy Network, a London-based think tank. The $10,000 prize – now in its third year but already among the most prestigious international awards for journalists – was inspired by the 19th-century French philosopher Frédéric Bastiat, who used satire and wit to explain complex economic and political issues in ways the average reader could understand.

Each year, writers from many of the world’s leading publications enter the Bastiat Prize. The competition for the 2004 prize was particularly stiff, with entries from writers in more than 40 countries. The winners were judged by a panel that included Nobel Laureate economist Milton Friedman, Mystery of Capital author Hernando de Soto, former New Zealand Finance Minister Ruth Richardson, and Dixon’s Group founder Lord Kalms of Edgware.

The prizes were awarded by Paul Gigot, Editorial Board Editor of The Wall Street Journal, who also gave the keynote address at the awards dinner, which was held at the Princeton Club in New York City. Gigot was preceded by Leon Louw, director of the Free Market Foundation in South Africa and three-times Nobel Peace Prize nominee. Julian Morris, Director of International Policy Network, presided over the ceremony.

Comments from the Judges


Lord Kalms of Edgeware said that Robert Guest “clearly portrays the size and range of the depth of despair of the African situation. His article is a highly disciplined analysis that is capable of shifting and focussing a wide range of influential thinkers.” Bret Stephens, another judge and former editor of the Jerusalem Post, agreed that Guest’s article demonstrated “superb reporting, clear thinking and great moral clarity”.

Judge Ruth Richardson said that “John Stossel confronts the modern curses of the developing and developed world; welfare addiction and trade protectionism. He triumphs for his willingness to expose the hypocrisy of corporate and middle class welfare.”

Judge Dora De Ampuero, director of Ecuador’s Instituto Ecuatoriano de Política Pública, said “Munir Attaullah makes a strong case for a vigorous and independent media as the single most powerful catalyst facilitating progress toward an open and democratic society. He warns against those elements which, in the name of some higher value and apparently good intentions, want to control what people see and hear.”

Edward Crane, Director of the Cato Institute in Washington, DC, said that “[Munir Attaullah] is incredibly courageous to be so outspoken in Pakistan.”


2003 WINNER:
Wall Street Journal Writer Wins Journalism Prize

October 23, 2003

NEW YORK CITY—Last night, the International Policy Network awarded its Frédéric Bastiat Prize for Journalism to Brian Carney, an editorial writer for the Wall Street Journal Europe. He received a US$7000 cash prize and engraved glass candlestick. His winning articles discussed Andorra’s resistance to the EU’s “Savings Tax Directive” which requires information sharing on all account holders, the troubles facing France Telecom, and how recent corporate scandals (such as WorldCom and Enron) actually demonstrate the strengths of capitalism.

Ed Crane, President of the CATO Institute, Washington DC, and one of the judges described Carney as a, “…Clear, insightful writer. Well grounded in philosophy of liberty and explains complex issues with ease and wit.”

Second prize—$3000 and a candlestick—was awarded to Stephen Pollard, a senior fellow at the Centre for the New Europe (London) and frequent contributor to The Times (UK), The Independent (UK) and the Wall Street Journal Europe.

Pollard’s writing was described by judge Sir Stanley Kalms as an “Extremely clear translation of complex issues into lucid simplicity with style, humour and clever analogy.”

Honorable Mention went to Rakesh Wadhwa, a columnist for The Himalayan Times and The BOSS, a Nepalese business magazine.

Nobel Prize winner Milton Friedman praised Wadhwa for having the “…clearest and most principled position from an unlikely country and circumstance”

The Frédéric Bastiat Prize is awarded annually by the International Policy Network to recognize and reward writers whose published works promote the institutions of a free society. The prize was inspired by the 19th century Fren ch philosopher Frédéric Bastiat and his compelling belief in free trade and defense of liberty. Bastiat's brilliant use of satire enabled him to turn even the most complex of economic issues into a tale to which the average person could relate. The candlestick awarded to the winners represents one of his most well-known works, “The Candlemaker’s Petition.” The International Policy Network is a UK-based charity which works with writers and organizations around the world to “share ideas that free people”

This year, over 150 people from 33 different countries submitted articles. Last year, Amity Shlaes of the Financial Times, and Sauvik Chakaraverti of Economic Times shared first place, and Robert Pollock of the Wall Street Journal received an honorable mention.

Winning 2003 articles

Brian Carney - First Prize

Europe's Tiny Tax Havens Have Survival Skills
Brian Carney

Remember the Minitel?
Brian Carney
2003-10-27

Scandals Show America's Strength
Brian Carney
2003-10-27

Stephen Pollard, runner-up

Labour chooses to deny choice to the rest of us
Stephen Pollard
2003-10-27

This is the worst way to protect the third world
Stephen Pollard
2003-10-27

Brown must stop throwing money at state monopolies
Stephen Pollard
2003-10-27

Rakesh Wadhwa -- Honorable mention

(only one article available online):
"Does Nepal need foreign aid?"



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