Out of Control Policy Blog

Saving Environmentalism Through Markets

The Economist weighs in on market-based environmental policy:

    "Mandate, regulate, litigate." That has been the green mantra. And it explains the world's top-down, command-and-control approach to environmental policymaking. Slowly, this is changing. Yesterday's failed hopes, today's heavy costs and tomorrow's demanding ambitions have been driving public policy quietly towards market-based approaches. One example lies in the assignment of property rights over "commons", such as fisheries, that are abused because they belong at once to everyone and no one. Where tradable fishing quotas have been issued, the result has been a drop in over-fishing. Emissions trading is also taking off. America led the way with its sulphur-dioxide trading scheme, and today the EU is pioneering carbon-dioxide trading with the (albeit still controversial) goal of slowing down climate change.

    These, however, are obvious targets. What is really intriguing are efforts to value previously ignored "ecological services", both basic ones such as water filtration and flood prevention, and luxuries such as preserving wildlife. At the same time, advances in environmental science are making those valuation studies more accurate. Market mechanisms can then be employed to achieve these goals at the lowest cost. Today, countries from Panama to Papua New Guinea are investigating ways to price nature in this way

Read the whole thing here (as well as this more extensive piece in the same issue).

And be sure to check out Michael De Alessi's work on Individual Fishing Quotas for a great example of free market environmentalism in action.

(hat tip: The Commons)

Leonard Gilroy is Director of Government Reform


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