Out of Control Policy Blog

More on Fairness

We have discussed a number of times on the blog the fact that complaints about the rich not paying their "fair share" lack a definition of fairness. Fairness in some ways is a subjective question. That is why we need a clear standard by which we think it is the most appropriate way to collect taxes before we can determine how that tax burden will be shared by society. Picking up on the questioning of fairness theme, Steve Moore has a list of fairness questions in his WSJ op-ed today. Here are a few highlights:

  • Is it fair that some of Mr. Obama's largest campaign contributors received federal loan guarantees on their investments in renewable energy projects that went bust?
  • Is it fair that the richest 1% of Americans pay nearly 40% of all federal income taxes, and the richest 10% pay two-thirds of the tax?
  • Is it fair that American corporations pay the highest statutory corporate tax rate of all other industrialized nations but Japan, which cuts its rate on April 1?
  • Is it fair that President Obama sends his two daughters to elite private schools that are safer, better-run, and produce higher test scores than public schools in Washington, D.C.—but millions of other families across America are denied that free choice and forced to send their kids to rotten schools?
  • Is it fair that after the first three years of Obamanomics, the poor are poorer, the poverty rate is rising, the middle class is losing income, and some 5.5 million fewer Americans have jobs today than in 2007?
  • Is it fair that the three counties with America's highest median family income just happen to be located in the Washington, D.C., metro area?
  • Is it fair that wind, solar and ethanol producers get billions of dollars of subsidies each year and pay virtually no taxes, while the oil and gas industry—which provides at least 10 times as much energy—pays tens of billions of dollars of taxes while the president complains that it is "subsidized"?
  • Is it fair that those who work full-time jobs (and sometimes more) to make ends meet have to pay taxes to support up to 99 weeks of unemployment benefits for those who don't work?
  • Is it fair that those who took out responsible mortgages and pay them each month have to see their tax dollars used to subsidize those who acted recklessly, greedily and sometimes deceitfully in taking out mortgages they now can't afford to repay?
  • Is it fair that Boeing, a private company, was threatened by a federal agency when it sought to add jobs in a right-to-work state rather than in a forced-union state?

See the whole article here.

Anthony Randazzo is Director of Economic Research


« Red-Light Cameras and the Enigmatic… | Main | Missing Forest Through the Peach… »




Out of Control Policy Archives